Tuesday, March 11, 2014

Highlight: Backstage at the Lincoln Assassination by Thomas Bogar

19249952

Book Description

 November 4, 2013
April 14, 1865. A famous actor pulls a trigger in the presidential balcony, leaps to the stage and escapes, as the president lies fatally wounded. In the panic that follows, forty-six terrified people scatter in and around Ford’s Theater as soldiers take up stations by the doors and the audience surges into the streets chanting, “Burn the place down!”

This is the untold story of Lincoln’s assassination: the forty-six stage hands, actors, and theater workers on hand for the bewildering events in the theater that night, and what each of them witnessed in the chaos-streaked hours before John Wilkes Booth was discovered to be the culprit. In Backstage at the Lincoln Assassination, historian Thomas A. Bogar delves into previously unpublished sources to tell the story of Lincoln’s assassination from behind the curtain, and the tale is shocking. Police rounded up and arrested dozens of innocent people, wasting time that allowed the real culprit to get further away. Some closely connected to John Wilkes Booth were not even questioned, while innocent witnesses were relentlessly pursued. Booth was more connected with the production than you might have known—learn how he knew each member of the cast and crew, which was a hotbed of secessionist resentment. Backstage at the Lincoln Assassination also tells the story of what happened to each of these witnesses to history, after the investigation was over—how each one lived their lives after seeing one of America’s greatest presidents shot dead without warning.

Backstage at the Lincoln Assassination is an exquisitely detailed look at this famous event from an entirely new angle. It is must reading for anyone fascinated with the saga of Lincoln’s life and the Civil War era.

Image of Thomas A. BogarThomas A. Bogar holds a Ph.D. in Theatre History/Criticism/Literature from Louisiana State University. He has taught theatre for forty years, most recently at Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia and Hood College in Frederick, Maryland. He is also the author of John E. Owens (2002), American Presidents Attend the Theatre (2006), and numerous journal articles. He has served as a judge for Washington, D.C.'s Helen Hayes Theatre Awards, and lives in Silver Spring, Maryland.




Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...